PC Ratatouille – An Introduction to Mice

Greetings everybody! As I’ve mentioned in my post about mouse pads, I was chasing down some mice on that Rodent Boulevard and I’ve snatched one, so today I’ll analyze it for you guys before having some fun with it then maybe eating it.

Just so you know, I literally ate grilled mouse meat once a while ago, since it was supposedly a delicacy in one of my mother’s employees’ hometown or something, and I must say… it… wasn’t very delicious. Edible, but I guess even for cats, mice are not food after all. They are just a play thing. I like fish better.

Ehem… Anyway, let us begin…

How a Mouse Works


The insides of the Logitech G502, our main star for today.
The insides of the Logitech G502, our main star for today.

How a basic mouse works is pretty… basic, so I won’t talk for very long about this stuff. I’ll only talk about the optical mouse here, since pretty much no one still use ball mice anyway.

  • Ok, so the most complicated part of the mouse is its sensor mechanism. Basically, in every mouse, there will be a light (whether it be a regular LED light, a laser, an IR LED light, or a death ray) and a sensor. The light will light up the surface beneath the mouse (some lights are invisible though) and the sensor will receive the reflected image of the surface. As you move the mouse, the sensor will detect the tiny differences in the surface to detect movement and send the corresponding signals to the computer.
The Logitech G502 is widely known for its
The Logitech G502 is widely known for its “perfect sensor”. Too bad it’s still just electrical tidbits instead of a mysterious laser eye or something, though. ūüė¶
  • The buttons (including the “middle button” on the scroll wheel) on the mouse are just, well, buttons, connected to switches which send signals to the computer when pressed, nothing new here.
The Logitech G600, a.k.a. a Razer Naga that works. Just try to memorize all your macros instead of mistaking it for a dialpad.
The Logitech G600, a.k.a. a Razer Naga that works. Just try to memorize all your macros instead of mistaking it for a dialpad.
  • The scroll wheel is a bit more complicated, but not so much. It’s connected to a mechanism that detects how much it’s rotated, and in which direction, by nudges. Basically, a nudge is, if you scroll the wheel really gently, from when you start scrolling to the time the scroll wheel slightly stops and the page starts scrolling.
Man, that scroll wheel on the R.A.T. Pro X looks metal as f... as feline food, man!
Man, that scroll wheel on the R.A.T. Pro X looks metal as f… as feline food, man!

Things to look for in a mouse


Well, before getting into more details with the next parts, I’ll tell you the most basic things you should consider when getting a mouse. Any mouse.

  • First, you should look at the sensor quality. This will determine how smooth and accurate your mouth is, which is the most important aspect of a mouse.
  • Second, you should look at the switches quality. These switches are what activate the functions of the mouse, lying under the buttons. You won’t want your buttons to stop working any time soon.
  • Next, you should look at the mouse’s extra functions. Most decent mice nowadays will have at least the back and forward buttons. Some mice will also have extra scroll wheels or macro buttons and such.
  • And last but not least, you should consider if the mouse’s ergonomics work for you. This one is quite subjective since whether a mouse will feel comfortable for you depends a lot on your hand size and your grip type. I’ll get more into this later.

    Yep, something like this should be most comfortable on the hand...
    Yep, something like this should be most comfortable on the hand…

Mouse Ergonomics


  • Left-Handed or Right Handed: Most mice are right-handed, and most ambidextrous mice suck, so unfortunately there aren’t many options for left-handed people, to be honest. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t any good option. Some really good left-handed mice still exist, such as the¬†Razer DeathAdder Left-Handed Edition (yeah… the DeathAdder is the only thing I actually like from Razer…), and some¬†modular mice can be customized so that they’re left-handed. Apparently,¬†some mice felt so good that it made some people ambidextrous, too… O_o
You have one saving grace, Razer! One saving grace...
You have one saving grace, Razer! One saving grace…
  • Grip Types: There are three basic grip types for mice users, which are:
    • Palm Grip: Your whole hand rests on the mouse, with the fingers stretched out and most of the palm resting on the body of the mouse.
    • Claw Grip: Your fingers bend in and your fingertips rest on the mouse, with your palm resting on the back of your mouse or on your mousepad.
    • Fingertip Grip: Your fingers are stretched out but only the fingertips touch the mouse. Your palm virtually doesn’t touch the mouse at all.
A picture describing the three grips. Much better than my words, as always.
A picture describing the three grips. Much better than my words, as always.
  • Weighting: Since the mouse is a device of comfort, the mouse’s weight and weight balance are aalso very important. You want a mouse that has the right weight, not too light or heavy, with most of the weight at the back and center of the mouse, not the far right or left. There are also some modular mice that lets you customize the weighting by adding weights in certain places.
This is not my pic, but I did this too and it helped with the weight balance. If you have a Logitech G602, you should do this too. Don't worry, it works.
This is not my pic, but I did this too and it helped with the weight balance. If you have a Logitech G602, you should do this too. Don’t worry, it works.

Types of Mice


  • Gaming Mice:

    These mice are cool-looking mice, often with tons of function for gaming like DPI switching, programmable buttons and modularity.

    • For a gaming mouse, sensor quality is the top priority concern, since you’ll need very quick yet accurate mouse movements for gaming.
    • The mouse’s DPI (which stands for “dots per inch”, which is basically the mouse’s sensitivity or “speed”) is the next concern. Normally for a gaming mouse, you’d like to be able to change DPI on the fly for when you need to snipe or scout around, along with a high maximum DPI.

      By the way, a quick speed for everyday work would be around 2000 DPI. And yes, 12,000 DPI is literally 6 times faster.
      By the way, a quick speed for everyday work would be around 2000 DPI. And yes, 12,000 DPI is literally 6 times faster.
    • The number of buttons on a gaming mouse will also be usually much higher than on a work mouse or trackball, especially for MMO and MOBA mice. Most of the time all of these buttons will also be programmable to do certain functions (like rage-quitting the game, for example), counting the main buttons (left mouse, right mouse and middle button).

      The Razer Naga, a.k.a. a Logitech G600 that doesn't work.
      The Razer Naga, a.k.a. a Logitech G600 that doesn’t work.
    • Many gaming mice are also modular, meaning there are extra buttons, weights or finger rests that you can install into the mouse’s main body to fit your needs.

      Put these in their right places. And then you can finally have the weirdest mouse ever.
      Put these in their right places. And then you can finally have the weirdest mouse ever.
    • Gaming mice also normally look very edgy and full of LEDs, because you know, gaming is fancy and aggressive and stuff. Oh, and everything needs LEDs.

      LET YOUR EYES BUUUURRNNN!!! Ok, seriously though, this Logitech G303 is actually a pretty nice mouse.
      LET YOUR EYES BUUUURRNNN!!! Ok, seriously though, this Logitech G303 is actually a pretty nice mouse.
    • Since the mouse is a much more mobile device than the keyboard, wireless gaming mice are also much more welcomed than wireless keyboards. However, as with all gaming devices, the number of wired gaming mice still trump over the number of wireless gaming mice.

      About time I post my personal mouse. Look ma, no tails!
      About time I post my personal mouse. Look ma, no tails!
  • Work Mice:

    Work mice differ to gaming mice in that they focus more on portability, versatility and comfort rather than macros or DPI.

    • Contrary to gaming mice, most work mice are wireless. They will also normally be somewhat smaller.

      Hello~ there tiny tweeny mickey!
      Hello~ there tiny tweeny mickey!
    • Work mice manufacturers generally put more effort into their mice’s ergonomics than gaming mice. This is not to say that a work mouse will always be more comfortable, though.

      Let's just hope that our mice are not actually made from cheap wood...
      Let’s just hope that our mice are not actually made from cheap wood…
    • Fancy features on a work mice normally include an extra horizontal scroll wheel or sensors that can track on glass, which also means that they will be able to track on pretty much every surface.

      Scrolling your horizontal scrollwheel on glass. Yes, this Logitech MX Master should be the best mouse ever...
      Scrolling your horizontal scrollwheel on glass. Yes, this Logitech MX Master should be the best mouse ever…
  • Trackballs:

    Trackball mice (not to be confused with classic trackballs, which only consist of a ball and no mouse) are work mice with a small trackball on them. The trackball works like a classic trackball: You can roll it to move your cursor around rather than moving your mouse. Personally, I find them pretty worthless.

    WARNING: Your child may mistake the trackball for candy. MORE IMPORTANT WARNING: This is more expensive than the excellent Logitech M705.
    WARNING: Your child may mistake the trackball for candy. MORE IMPORTANT WARNING: This is more expensive than the excellent Logitech M705.
  • Touch Mice:

    Ugh, the filthy iFan peasantry stuff… touch mice are mice with a flat touch surface that you can swipe and do gestures on. They’re identified by their extreme un-comfort, as well as their sky-high price and their in-and-out worthless gimmickery.

    Just... Get out of my eyes! NOW!
    Just… Get out of my eyes! NOW!

Some Mice Brands Worth Considering


  • My personal favorite brand for both work and gaming mice is Logitech! They have the best sensors around and their mice are also known to be extremely comfortable. My personal G602 is a bit too big for my hand (I’m just a petite high school girl), and yet I still love to hold it.
  • If you are looking for a good and edgy modular mouse, then Mad Catz should be your choice. Their R.A.T. series are pretty much the most badass and customizable mice around. Can’t say for sure about their comfort though…
  • Although I personally find their designs a bit counter-intuitive, Corsair mice are still characterized by their top-quality components and thus all-around high reliability, as with every other Corsair product (save for non-hi-end PSUs…). Their FPS mice, like the M65, are exceptionally good.
  • Roccat is also a very good brand for mice, even though they may be lesser known. Their mice have pretty good sensors and designs that make sense.
  • If you can find them for a good price (since they can be quite overpriced at some areas, like mine), then Tt eSports also make some solid mice, like the Theron.
  • Living in a country like mine? Then you can consider the budget peripherals manufacturer FoxXray (their website is currently “under construction” so I can’t link them). They may not have the best mice around, but they do bring very¬†high-quality stuff for their¬†low price.
  • You can try out the Razer DeathAdder too. It’s the sole thing that I’d consider from Razer, and that says a lot considering how popular they are.

Ok then, let me end my blog post here. I’m done with my feline behaviors and chasing down mice and stuff now. I hope you’ll have a better idea of how to choose a mouse instead of just going for the latest Razer rodent after reading this post… and uhm… once again, happy building and thank you very much for your support! ^^

(…really, I still need to work very hard on my introductions and conclusions… o_o)

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